Tough Love

I serioulsy love this post. Parenting isn’t easy, special needs or not. It takes work to not be a “because I said so” parent (this answer should only be given maybe 5% of the time). It takes work to TEACH a child how the world works, to help it make sense to them. It’s tough to put someone else’s needs above your own. It’s tough to take time to understand why they’re hurting when they don’t have the language to explain it. THAT is tough love.

Raising Mama

“Tough love,” says the mother as she forces her child to the busy street corner with a sign declaring his sins to the world.

“Tough love,” nods the father as he blasts his daughter’s laptop into pieces and posts the video online.

“Tough love,” applauds the Internet commenters, when a photo of a note goes viral, a note that says “You came home past your curfew, so you can sleep on the porch. You’re lucky I gave you a pillow this time.”

View original post 607 more words

LOVE, NOT FEAR

So long in coming. So glad it did.

Aspie Minister

This posting is part of the Flashblog presented by “Boycott Autism Speaks.”

LOVE; NOT FEAR

Feb. 14, 2014

 Five Months; nine days; and counting.

 September 5, 2013.  The day I got my diagnosis of Asperger’s.  I had been suspecting it for a while, of course, and had seen a neuropsychologist for testing.  At 66 years old, I had been shocked to start figuring out I was an Aspie.   I wasn’t sure how the official diagnosis would feel.

 On Sept. 5th, I went to the office of the neuro-psychologist to get my diagnosis.  When she said, “You definitely have Asperger’s,” a weight was lifted from my shoulders.  66 years of weight.

 I thought, “Oh, my God – that explains EVERYTHING about me that I didn’t understand.  EVERYTHING.”

 In these five plus month, the weights have continued to fall off.

 I no longer go through my day in fear, thinking…

View original post 163 more words

Wandering

Wandering

This has never been a challenge in our lives, but I’ve heard of it, and read the tragic stories in the news. How hard it is to balance safety with self-reliance; understanding that there’s a desire we aren’t aware of or don’t recognize, but that is clear to the person who “wanders”; to not take away anything to ensure safety, but to find safe ways to make more possible.